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Indiecon

2015

The independent
Magazine Festival

Conference:
28+29 Aug 2015
#indiemagDay:
30 Aug 2015

Hamburg, Germany

This is about independent magazine makers. It’s about leaving your comfort zone and making something of your own. It’s about the indiemags that experiment with new and old ways in everything they do, from collaboration and organisation to distribution and networking. By focusing on the work and life models that fuel independent publishing, we’ll reveal how magazine makers create content and design with real substance. We'll talk about what it means to make a magazine and what the meaning of magazine making may be, and we’ll ask how it pays the bills.

Tickets

We are heartbroken, but there are only 100 seats at the conference venue. Therefore we give precedence to magazine makers. If you do not work for a magazine, we will try to consider your application nevertheless.

Thank you for your application! Please watch your Emails, we'll get back to you as soon as possible.

Hintergrund

Speakers

Daniel Beskos

Daniel Beskos

What is Indie?
"Working with people you like on magazines and books that are well done and worth being published"

Founder Daniel Beskos has already scooped tons of awards for mairisch Verlag's programme and marketing. And it often goes like this: there's Daniel on the podium in front of a crowd of suits with fat media budgets. If anyone asks what he's invested, the answer is: 0 euros. One of his brilliant ideas is the Indiebookday, which he has organised annually since 2013. He was also the inspiration behind #indiemagday – Daniel, in turn, borrowed the idea from recordstoreday. He started in the mid-1990s with literature fanzines, today he takes hardcovers in high-end design to the people.

See him here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday 13:00 h
Find him online: mairisch Verlag, @danielbeskos
Photo: Andreas Hornoff

Kai Brach

Kai Brach

What is Indie?
"Throwing established wisdom overboard"

Kai Brach is the octopus of Independent magazine makers. The "Offscreen" man's Facebook group of publishers is the stuff of legend. First and foremost, he's a damn good guy who helps where he can selflessly and without hesitation. His subject is the Web and tech industry, Kai is a former Web designer. Today, his medium is fine, smooth paper – though the blog that goes with "Offscreen" is almost a magazine in its own right. As a well-networked one-man-magazine-machine, Brach is now able to make a living from "Offscreen". His subjects: what printed mags can learn from the Web and why they will never die.

See him here: Indiecon Summer School
Find him online: Offscreen, @offscreenmag
Photo: Mark Lobo

Sabine Cole

Sabine Cole

What is Indie?
"To decide independently what you want or have to depend on"

Sabine Cole is one of those people who really make a difference. After the attacks on Charlie Hebdo, she and her team published a special issue of the magazine "loved & found" under the title "Nous sommes humains". Usually, "loved & found" is a glossy lifestyle publication – this issue was in black and white and on newsprint paper. Apparently, the team didn't even consider target groups or audiences. Their one thought was to achieve the maximum circulation of a humanistic message. "We want to encourage people to leave their plain-and-simple comfort zone", Sabine says in the editorial. Her own biography reflects a certain appetite for challenges: she was previously editor-in-chief of the men's magazine "Feld Hommes" and has also headed "Audi Magazine". Today, she is part of the design and editorial studio zmyk.

See her here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday 11:00 h / Concept and Design Talk, Saturday
Find her online: zmyk
Photo: Simone Scardovelli

Johannes Conrad

Johannes Conrad

What is Indie?
"Turning the tables"

Flaneur magazine – the name reveals its great virtue: it combines the easiness of the casual stroller with clever observation and time for a special place. Johannes Conrad pours the multi-layered observations into a mould, together with Michelle Philipps, the other half of the Yukiko design office. The two have been working together for three years, often in collaboration with artists, photographers, film-makers and set-builders. The result is creations of enormous visual impact – and underpinnings for great stories.

See him here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday 16:30 h
Find him online: Studio Yukiko, @studio_yukiko
Photo: Michelle Phillips

Anke Eberhardt

Anke Eberhardt

What is Indie?
"inspiring, niche dedicated, deadline heavy, insane, exceptional"

Niches are where Anke feels at home – mainstream is not really her thing. Some magazines she built from scratch, others she further developed. She is the editor-in-chief of the DIY fashion magazine "Cut", which basically reinvented the idea of cutting patterns by inserting cutting patterns of clothes which people would actually want to wear. "Cut" changes constantly – no wonder Anke describes herself as especially loving the diversity in her job. That's also why she has several projects running on the side, for example freelance jobs for the snowboard magazine "pleasure". And it may be why she also calls herself a "mountain woman"? Anyway, that's one for you to think about.

See her here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday 13:00 h
Find her online: Cut
Photo: Evi Lemberger

Jens Feddersen

Jens Feddersen

What is Indie?
"Being able to say no when the feeling is no, however tempting the deal may sound."

Jens Feddersen has done his job perfectly if you never even notice he's there. For example, when the long-awaited mag arrives in your mailbox on time on the right date. What happens between printing and delivery is his metier – and there's a lot to it. A day out visiting Jens' machines takes you to a world of folders and labellers, pallets and steel racks, in short: logistics and its pleasures, great and small. Hidden operations, barely visible processes – that seems to attract Jens somehow. In his first career he was a chemist, now – as part of "Heftwerk" – he takes care of the storage and distribution of various indie titles. How a printed magazine gets from A to B, what that costs and how the process could maybe be optimised – he'll answer these questions at Indiecon.

See him here: Production and Distribution Talk, Saturday
Find him online: Heftwerk, @heftwerk

Ryan Fitzgibbon

Ryan Fitzgibbon

What is Indie?
"Finding motivation in the attempt to prove everyone wrong"

This magazine is not about boys or men, it is about Misters. And the Mister that Ryan Fitzgibbon portrays in "Hello Mr." is so comprehensively cool, smart and sexy that (probably) most guys would like to be like him. Ryan started his career as a communication designer at IDEO in San Francisco, in 2012 he moved to Australia to go about his own venture in storytelling. By March 2013, he had launched the first issue of "Hello Mr.". From the beginning, he started to build a strong community around the magazine. It is a community of men who date men, but what properly unites them is their shared goal of starting new conversations about their evolved interests, values, and aspirations. Needless to say he moved to the apparent capital of Misters on our planet – New York – after a year, to continue independently publishing his biannual magazine. In Hamburg, he will hopefully enlighten us about the secrets of Misterhood.

See him here: Keynote, Golden Hall, Saturday 15:00 h
Find him online: Hello Mr., @ryanfitzgibbon

Steven Gregor

Steven Gregor

What is Indie?
"Indie is Shia LaBeouf's rattail, not Kim Kardashian's butt"

Ok, let's talk about what is indie. Steven's response (see above) is maybe one of the most unsettling ones we ever received. Have you checked out Shia LaBoeuf's rattail?. Time for some explanation, Mr Gregor: "Indie is a frame of mind. It's an intention… a voice different from the norm. Indie is risk". Thank you. Steven is a London-based art director and editorial designer, he publishes "Gym Class", a bi-annual zine about magazines and the people who make them. The title of the last issue read "nobody cares about your (oh-so-cool kickstarted tactile minimalist unoriginal) magazine". It is great. He also maintains the "Gym Class" Instagram and Tumblr feeds, featuring the very best of contemporary magazine covers.

See him here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday 16:30 h
Find him online: Gym Class Mag, @gymclassmag

Dolf Hermannstädter

Dolf Hermannstädter

What is Indie?
"Overrated"

After almost 30 years and more than 170 issues, Dolf is still publisher and author of "Trust". There is probably no known punk or hardcore band "Trust" hasn't featured (unless they didn't want to). The team behind "Trust" claims they started the zine because there was no publication featuring their music taste. So they began covering all aspects of the music they love and the stuff that comes along with it, while trying to avoid the pitfalls of a narrow-minded taste in music by occasionally listening to something else.

See him here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday 13:00 h
Find him online: Trust Zine, @trustzine
Photo: Frank Scheffka

Michael Hopp

Michael Hopp

What is Indie?
"When it has to do with ourselves - and therefore with others"

Last year's Indiecon inspired Michael Hopp to start his own event series on (independent) publishing: his "Blattkritik Salon" has become an excellent periodical for magazine makers in and around Hamburg, featuring e.g. Bernd Runge with "Noah", Ale Dumbsky's "Read" or Max Dax, formerly of "Intro" and "Electronic Beats". As one of the founders of the indie classic "Wiener" and an editor of "Tempo", he is used to challenging principles of writing, thinking, understanding – a position he now tries to implant in corporate publishing with his editorial office "Hopp und Frenz" (HuF).

See him here: Panel, Golden Hall, Friday 16:00 h / Content Talk, Saturday
Find him online: Hopp und Frenz

Ole Jendis

Ole Jendis

What is Indie?
"Founding an indie now - probably both the craziest and the best point in time"

Ole is your man for the moolah: as the publishing director, he takes care of finance and marketing at "Impulse". His new favourite word is "strategy" – and that's something a lot of indiemag makers don't have, says Ole. His creed: with a clear goal, vision and idea for the mag, indie titles can be successful businesses – or at least pay their own print costs.

See him here: Strategy Talk, Saturday
Find him online: Impulse, @olejendis
Photo: Arnold Morascher

Julia Kahl

Julia Kahl

What is Indie?
"The most possible freedom"

There are magazines you want to read and there are magazines you want to lick, stroke, cuddle and take to bed. Slanted is definitely one of the most lickable magazines around, with an always unique look and feel. Julia Kahl is in charge of the constantly transforming design publication. She studied communication design at the University of Applied Arts in Darmstadt before she started to work at Magma Brand Design for Slanted Blog and Magazine as a managing editor. Since July 2014 she is co-owner of the company Slanted Publishers which she runs together with Lars Harmsen.

See her here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday 16:30 h
Find here online: Slanted, @slanted_blog

Philipp Köster

Philipp Köster

What is Indie?
"Exploit yourself instead of being exploited by others"

Philipp Köster launched his indie career with a fanzine. Its circulation: 1000. Naturally, football was his theme even then – more precisely, Arminia Bielefeld, a team not exactly favoured by fortune. The idea may have been born of suffering, at any rate Philipp and his gang started early on to tell football in a different way. As a human story, with an eye for the little things that go on off the field and for the whole tremendous ecosystem that is football. In 2000, he founded "11Freunde" together with Reinaldo Coddou H. and nearly met his financial death from distribution fever. "It's just not enough to produce good texts and visuals if you aren't selling any advertising and the distribution side doesn't work", says Philipp. He therefore got publishing house Gruner+Jahr on board in 2010, they now own 51 percent of the shares. How much indie spirit remains?

See him here: Keynote, Golden Hall, Friday, 15:00 h / Panel, Golden Hall, Friday, 16:00 h
Find him online: 11Freunde, @philippkoester
Photo: David von Becker

Chris Köver

Chris Köver

What is Indie?
"When the topic is more important than the money you earn from it"

Chris Köver is a journalist, feminist, activist and constantly dissatisfied with the social status quo. She is co-founder and publisher of "Missy Magazine", and currently an editor at "Wired Germany". Chris writes about politics, pop, technology and internet culture. Together with Sonja Eismann and Daniela Burger she also published three DIY-books for girls. In 2014, she spent three month in the New York headquarter of "Vice" as an Arthur F. Burns fellow – and now has a better understanding of what "Indie" can mean in a media context.

See her here: Keynote, Golden Hall, Saturday, 11:00 h
Find her online: Missy Magazine, @ckoever
Photo: Stefanie Rau

Jeremy Leslie

Jeremy Leslie

What is Indie?
"Complete control"

Jeremy Leslie combines absolute indie authority with British understatement. His magCulture Journal site may be the most viable resource for people interested in independent editorial design, his books like Making Magazines and The Modern Magazine are already classics. When you meet him at a conference, though, it's likely he'll be holding a camera phone in your face to take a picture for Instagram. It may be due to his easygoing attitude or his unbelievable activity, but no matter where you look in the indie scene, Jeremy seems to be there. He brings along 25 years of experience in editorial design, with recent work ranging from creative direction of Fiera magazine to online publishing project Aeon via various consultancy roles including creative direction for Luxembourg's Maison Moderne. He also runs the annual Modern Magazine conference in London.

See him here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday, 16:30 h
Find him online: Magculture, @magculture

Ibrahim Nehme

Ibrahim Nehme

What is Indie?
"Indie is a blueprint of the world you want to live in – made with no budget"

Three years ago, Ibrahim Nehme quit the advertising world and founded "The Outpost". Published from Beirut and dubbed 'a magazine of possibilities', The Outpost is a bi-annual print publication that aims to become a catalyst for social change in the Arab world. "The Outpost" does not have an office and it does not have staff. It still feels like a luxury product. The only thing you think about when you flip the pages is the clear cut vision it stands for.

See him here: Keynote, Golden Hall, Friday, 18:00 h
Find him online: The Outpost, @theoutpostme
Photo: Ieva Saudargaite

Klaus Neuburg

Klaus Neuburg

What is Indie?
"Doing it anyway."

There's a zoo living in Klaus' wallet. If he picks a business card from it, the lucky recipient can decide between fish, bird or salamander – all of them printed neatly on uncoated paper with handmade embossment. This attention to detail is the stand-out characteristic of the work of Klaus and his friend and business partner Sebastian Pranz. They are the founders of an editorial and design office called (ha, ha!) Buero Zoo. They also publish "Froh!", together with a team of journalists, photographers and designers. "Froh!" is a magazine about society, every issue focuses on a broad topic, for example "harvest", "light" or "luxury". The team also travels around the world to pass on their notion of independence to students and young magazine makers in Georgia, Moldova and elsewhere.

See him here: Keynote, Golden Hall, Saturday, 10:00 h / Indiecon Summer School
Find him online: Froh!, @frohmag
Photo: Simon Roth

Mads Pankow

Mads Pankow

What is Indie?
"A unique point of view, without thinking about the target audience"

Mads is everywhere. At least everywhere good. For example in YouTube videos of Martin Kohlstedt. His own feeling for great stuff is also what drives him as publisher of "Die Epilog". "Only if you keep straight to your own perspective will you find an audience that appreciates it," says Mads. His magazine asks questions like: how do our society and our culture change? Do they change or are we stuck? What inspired him to start were "grumpy old men in the features section". Ok, let's go get 'em!

See him here: Panel, Golden Hall, Friday, 16:00 h
Find him online: Die Epilog, @die_epilog
Photo: Maik Gräf

Sebastian Pranz

Sebastian Pranz

What is Indie?
"Indie is creating alternative public spheres!"

There is a mystery surrounding Sebastian. It is the mystery of the Spu. For some reason, people call him that. And if you get to know him a little, that's also how he signs his mails. Spu. We don't think it's a reference to "Socialist Party of the Ukraine" (first hit on Wikipedia), but what does it stand for? Is it a secret identity? What's the deal? Apart from exotic nicknames, Sebastian's interest lies in the transformation of societies through media and journalism. After finishing his PhD in sociology he started working as a publisher and with Klaus Neuburg founded Buero Zoo, a studio focusing on sustainable corporate publishing. They also make "Froh!" magazine. Sebastian and Klaus understand their work as part of an overall design mission for society at large. Maybe that's the mission of the Spu …

See him here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday, 12:30 h / Indiecon Summer School
Find him online: Froh!, @frohmag
Photo: Simon Roth

Tristan Rodgers

Tristan Rodgers

What is Indie?
"The freedom to do everything you like to do, and having it under your own control"

Redheads are one of the world's smallest minorities, they make up about 2% of the German population – a pretty small target group for a magazine. Nevertheless, being a redhead himself Tristan came up with the idea of creating an art- and interview-based project about red hair in 2013. One year later he published the first issue of "MC1R – The magazine for redheads", a collection of experiences that redheads had growing up – either positive or negative. Inspired by last year's Indiecon, Tristan changed the language and format of MC1R in order to reach a wider, more international audience.

See him here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday, 13:00 h
Find him online: Mc1r, @mc1r_magazine
Photo: Daniel Feistenauer

Stefan Rudnick

Stefan Rudnick

What is Indie?
"Indie is trying to operate outside the market."

Stefan Rudnick learned to work with a small budget when he was chief executive at the weekly "Jungle World". Later, he marketed the Berlin city magazine "zitty" and worked for several publishing companies. Today, he is mainly working in distribution for "carnivora Verlagsservice" – the company that was originally founded to distribute "Jungle World".

See him here: Production and Distribution Talk / Saturday
Find him online: Heftwerk, @heftwerk

Juliane Schiemenz

Juliane Schiemenz

What is Indie?
"When you do things differently from others – and can still pay your rent"

When you hold an issue of "Reportagen" in your hands you think: book. And just like a good book, "Reportagen" rapidly becomes your companion for daily escapes, into unknown worlds and formidable stories. On the other hand, you don't have to summon up the same patience as for reading a novel – reports, says Juliane Schiemenz, are for impatient people, like herself. So is it a compromise? More of a new genre between book and magazine that has been popping up in recent years. "Reportagen" has always been a pioneer in this movement. As head of the German editorial office, Juliane's mission will be to help establish the Swiss heavyweight and its newly infused form of storytelling in Germany.

See her here: Panel, Golden Hall, Friday, 16:00 h
Find her online: Reportagen, @reportagench

Christian Schiffer

Christian Schiffer

What is Indie?
"Indie is a promise."

Before former Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis was appointed, he used to tinker around with the financial system of gaming giant Valve. Yes, you've read it right: financial system! If the group were a state and the gamers on its platform the citizens – the nation would have double the population of Germany. To get to the point, gaming's a big thing – and Christian Schiffer is one of the few who knows how to communicate that adequately. In 2012, alongside his job with broadcaster Bayerischer Rundfunk, he founded "WASD", a bookazine for computer gaming culture. His publications are about indie games and mainstream games, but also about military simulations, for example, and the associated ethical issues. A few weeks ago, the seventh issue appeared. It's title translates into English as: "Love and hate - if you want to play, you have to feel". Immediate favourite sentence about sex in gaming: "Only the computer games, they're normally about as free and easy as a dog's tail caught in a door".

See him here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday 13:00 h
Find him online: WASD, @WASDMagazin
Photo: Laura Freisberg

Bastian Schlange

Bastian Schlange

What is Indie?
"Indie is a word I have never used in my life. Magazines need punk"

Bastian Schlange is a reporter and the magazine man for "Correct!v", the first non-profit investigative newsroom in the German-speaking world. What they're about: they do in-depth research on a socially relevant topic, and then publish the hell out of it. Articles and pictures that are free-to-use for media outlets, books, graphic novels, films, websites, magazines – a finished project spans diverse media. Bastian is the expert for the magazine part. He is part of "Ruhrbarone", a magazine focussing on stories about the industrial Ruhr area of Germany. He also founded the Wattenscheider Schule, an experimental project for unconventional undercover and Gonzo journalism. Born and raised in the Ruhr, he has worked as a freelancer for a number of daily newspapers, the Bild newspaper (know your enemies, right?) and the German Press Agency. In 2012, Bastian signed on with the Ankerherz publishing house as a blogger and author, writing down tales of old sailors (harrr!).

See him here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday, 11:00 h
Find him online: Correkt!v, @correctiv_org

Alexander Scholz

Alexander Scholz

What is Indie?
"A trade-off: the joy of answering to no one, the horrors of bearing all the risk"

Alexander Scholz is currently doing what he wants. What he really wants. It is called "Holo", has more than 200 pages and focuses on art, design and technology. He characterises it as "an attempt to anticipate the future by exploring stranger, more fantastical themes". His line of work right now is somewhere between design, contemporary art and fortune telling – and it is more than intriguing to follow him on that path. You feel in every neatly designed page, in every tactile and distinct detail, that Alex is making the magazine he always wanted to read. "I'm still not quite over the fact that it's out and a reality now", he says – and carries a copy around all the time as if for reassurance.

See him here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday, 16:30 h
Find him online: Holo, @holomagazine

Sebastian Senff

Sebastian Senff

What is Indie?
"Indie is the next stand alone complex, it's a creative challenge to the establishment."

Sebastian and his team have been digging their way into the indie mag scene for three years now. As a graduate engineer in printing and media technology, he's really on the technical side of the indie mag production chain. But the commitment he devotes to looking after rising magazine makers can only be explained by passion. At Indiecon, he represents the "Heftwerk" cooperative on questions about printing and production.

See him here: Production and Distribution Talk / Saturday
Find him online: Heftwerk, @heftwerk

Jan Spading

Jan Spading

What is Indie?
"To decide independently what you want or have to depend on"

Jan is an art director who claims to have "more to do with journalists than designers". And he likes it that way – it gives him special access to the written word that he designs in such a way that you can (and want to) read it. In 2003, Jan co-founded "Gee", one of the guiding-light magazines on video games. He works for industrial clients, agencies and independent magazines. His editorial design work for "Dummy" and "fluter" has received several awards.

See him here: Concept and Design Talk, Saturday
Find him online: zmyk
Photo: Simone Scardovelli

Fabian Weiss

Fabian Weiss

What is Indie?
"Indie is nerve-racking, self-exploiting and not paying your bills – but worth every minute you spend on it."

Fabian Weiss is always where the stories are. Right now that seems to be in Tallinn, Estonia, but it may be that next week he's somewhere across the Bosporus. His projects explore cultural changes in personal structures within a broader assessment of the surrounding culture. That basically means: he gets close without loosing the eye for the big picture. His work has been honoured by several international awards and his photographic essays have been exhibited internationally and published in numerous media including GEO, Der Spiegel and The New York Times. In Hamburg, he supports the Indiecon Summer School.

See him here: Keynote, Saturday, 10:00 h
Indiecon Summer School
Find him online: Fabian Weiss, @fabianweiss

Mathias Zeiske

Mathias Zeiske

What is Indie?
"Getting to choose the people you depend on"

"Edit" is a little bit like a friendly brain parasite. During its 22-year lifespan, it has had several hosts – for the past five years it has been with Mathias Zeiske. The magazine is what gets him out of bed in the morning, Mathias says. It features innovative contemporary writing, a whole diversity of literary forms, and translations. Interestingly, "Edit" is published by a non-profit organisation (Edit e.V.). It correlates with the book series "Volte", which Mathias also co-publishes. And it definitely triggers the right receptors in the brain …

See him here: Panel, Golden Hall, Saturday, 11:00 h
Find him online: Edit, @mathiaszeiske

Nicole Zepter

Nicole Zepter

What is Indie?
"Indie is always partly the future"

Nicole Zepter drives inspiration. As editor-in-chief of "Prinz" she made an advertising flyer into a magazine, now her remit is to get faltering media brands "Neon" and "Nido" back on track with new ideas. To do that, she has put her own major project "The Germans" on the back burner for now – instead, she's taking the Indie spirit to large publisher Gruner+Jahr.

See her here: Panel, Golden Hall, Friday, 16:00 h
Find her online: Neon/Nido, @nicolezepter
Photo: Holger Homann

Hintergrund

Schedule
Fr 28 Aug 2015

13:00

Entrance Hall / Saloon

Snack-in
 

Come in, come in! We celebrate your arrival with coffee and "Franzbrötchen" pastries.

15:00

Golden Hall

Keynote: Indie Fairytale
 

Philipp Köster is the editor-in-chief of Germany's most successful soccer magazine 11Freunde. If you believe the reviews and eulogies, he must be some insane combination of pope and godfather – or maybe Pelé and Pirlo, to stick with the right idiom. His tale is one of unbelievable indiemag momentum, but also of the limits of independent publishing. At some point he decided to let publishing company "Gruner+Jahr" take over. He'll tell us what happened up to then and afterwards.
 

Philipp Köster (11Freunde)

16:00

Golden Hall

Panel: Growth
 

First issue out – done! That's the beautifully simple reckoning of many independent magazines. Unfortunately, most of them remain one-shots – and the publishers have to fight their way through gigantic piles of unsold magazines when they want to cross their living-rooms. Creation is one thing, but making a magazine sustainable is a completely different story. We talk about growth with Philipp Köster, who started a fanzine and ended up creating "11Freunde". Nicole Zepter left her publication "The Germans" behind to revive the dwindling "Neon" and "Nido". Juliane Schiemenz's mission is also a matter of growth: as the new head of the German editorial department of "Reportagen", her role is to establish the Swiss heavyweight in Germany. Mads Pankow, on the other hand, is still far from commercial success – he's about to relaunch "Die Epilog" after four widely acclaimed but financially meagre issues.
 

Philipp Köster (11Freunde), Mads Pankow (Die Epilog), Juliane Schiemenz (Reportagen), Nicole Zepter (Nido/Neon). Facilitation: Michael Hopp (HuF)

18:00

Golden Hall

Keynote: A Magazine about possibilities
 

Ibrahim Nehme makes a magazine about possibilities – in an impossible place. He writes from Beirut against censorship, violence and discrimination in the Arab world, but also against the stereotypes in the minds of his Western readers. His pan-Arabic magazine "The Outpost" aims to inspire people to take their futures into their own hands – and succeed where the Arab Spring failed: by changing society in the Middle East. Ibrahim steps up to the mark without the backing of a publisher or major investors, but with excellent design and big stories. What can the revolution in magazine format achieve?
 

Ibrahim Nehme (The Outpost)

Schedule
Sa 29 Aug 2015

All day

Saloon

Magazine Selection
 

This year's Indiecon is about how independent publishing becomes sustainable and other very grown up and sober ideas. But sometimes you just have to have fun. For Indiecon 2015, the fabulous Stella Richter (Magasin) curated some of the most outgoing, expressive and stylish magazines out there, featuring WAX, Kraft, Perdiz, KubaParis, Some Mag, PussPuss and many many more. There is nothing else, that combines design, photography, ideas and paper better than magazines. Let reading be a special occasion and not just something you do to drive time between meetings!

9:30

Golden Hall

Intensive Talks
 

We invited experts to share their thoughts on some of the most important topics in independent publishing. After a brief introduction they will offer intensive sessions throughout the day (registration for sessions will be managed on site).
– Content: Michael Hopp is one of the most experienced and attentive editors we know. He will present his thoughts on the culture of criticism and on what makes magazines great in his opinion. In his sessions, he will offer an intensive critique for interested publishers.
– Concept and Design: Jan Spading and Sabine Cole work together in studio zmyk. Their approach is to strongly entwine editorial concept and design in their publications. In their sessions, they will be happy to provide guidance for prospective publishers or design feedback for recently launched or relaunched publications.
– Business Strategy: Ole Jendis is our man for the wallet. He shows how to develop the business aspects of an independent publication – and how to keep on top of things by following a clear-cut strategy. In his session he will provide inspiration and feedback for experienced publishers and newcomers alike.
– Production and Distribution: "Heftwerk" is the label that unites the work of Stefan Rudnick (Carnivora Verlagsservice), Sebastian Senff (BGZ Druck) and Jens Feddersen (OML Lettershop). Over the past years, they have developed a specific skill set to support smaller publications and independent publishers in production and distribution. They are here to give advice – not as salesmen – so that as many publishers as possible can profit from their experience.

10:00

Golden Hall

Introduction to Indiecon Summer School
 

The Indiecon Summer School is a five-day intensive course in independent publishing that will be held for the first time in the week before the Indiecon. It brings together emerging talent from the domains of design, photography, illustration, journalism and the arts. In a rapid publishing project, the participants will produce a printed magazine about a single topic: Hamburg's Oberhafen. The experienced magazine makers of "Buero Zoo" will lead participants through all stages of the production process – the result will be displayed for the first time during this session.
 

Klaus Neuburg / Sebastian Pranz / Fabian Weiss (Froh!)

10:30

Saloon

Buffet

Yummy!

11:00

Golden Hall

Panel: Are Indiemags the Better People?
 

Some magazines just make the world a better place. Because they're clever, far-sighted or simply because they address subjects that no one else pays any heed to. We look at titles that put ideals before marketing – and have become established all the same. For example, "Missy", founded in 2008 by Sonja Eismann, Stefanie Lohhaus and Chris Köver. The mag combines politics, pop culture and lifestyle with a feminist viewpoint – no one had ever done that before (at least not in Germany). Sebastian Pranz and Klaus Neuburg go more for the broad approach with "Froh!". The social magazine grew out of the non-profit work of Froh e.V., every issue is devoted to a major topic such as "movement" or "Transit". The reporters from "Correct!v" also work on a non-profit basis. Bastian Schlange explains how that makes investigative journalism more possible – and the role that magazines play in it. And Mathias Zeiske? He makes a literary magazine. Yes, with literature, real books and authors, ideas that are intended to make people laugh, cry, think. And on printed paper, at that. Must be just a hobby. Or not?
 

Chris Köver (Missy), Klaus Neuburg / Sebastian Pranz (Froh!), Bastian Schlange (Correkt!v), Mathias Zeiske (Edit). Facilitation: Sabine Cole (zmyk)

13:00

Golden Hall

Panel: Very Special for Very Many
 

In the last few years there has been a lot of take in large publishing houses about niche titles, by which they mean publications for the "men who cook" or "dynamic dog owners" target groups who are believed to be nestling in the remotest research corners between DINKs and digital escapists. We think: fuck you, target group analysis. You'd be better spending the money on magazines with heart-and-soul commitment. "Trust", for example. Up until this summer Dolf Hermannstädter has produced 174 issues – in words: one hundred and seventy-four – of the punk hardcore fanzines, consistently in black and white and consistently based on excellent information. Or treat yourselves to a copy of "Cut". Under the management of Anke Eberhardt, the DIY mag has blown a fresh wind through craft work and combined it with fashion, design, interior decoration, travel and art. Alternatively, invest your last pennies in "Mc1r" and learn something about the culture and art of people with red hair. Tristan Rodgers is currently building a media brand around the diffuse topic of "redheads" – and would like to earn money with "Mc1r" at some point. Computer Games, on the other hand - you can't really call them niche anymore. Some of them cost more than blockbuster movies - and they also earn more. Christian Schiffer provides this energetic field of culture with a printed hub called "WASD".
 

Dolf Hermannstädter (Trust), Anke Eberhardt (Cut), Tristan Rodgers (Mc1r), Christian Schiffer (WASD). Facilitation: Daniel Beskos (mairisch Verlag)

15:00

Golden Hall

Keynote: From Magazine to Global Community
 

Ryan Fitzgibbon has been making a magazine for and about "Misters" since 2013. His mag is pleasing yet doesn't shun conflict; above all it declines to use clichés that other homosexual and lifestyle magazines tend to fall back on. Maybe that's why it has formed the core of a community of people who are seeking dialogue about lifestyle, values, hopes and fears, in short: about the everyday lives of men who date men.
 

Ryan Fitzgibbon (Hello Mr.)

16:30

Golden Hall

Panel: Generator
 

Print is dead – long live print. Those who join in every hype about and requiem for printed magazines lead an exhausting life. The fact remains that magazines continue to be drivers of new ideas, for fashion, art, design and also for social development. That's demonstrated by Alexander Scholz's "Holo", for example, a magazine about digital art, science and technology. The mag is cerebral in the positive sense – densely packed, intelligent and filled with so much new stuff that it barely fits into one head. "Slanted", on the other hand, has been synonymous with design experiments and visual opulence since the first issue. The magazines have now got even fatter, each focusing on a design metropolis. Co-editor Julia Kahl explains why. Steven Gregor inveighs from time to time in "Gym Class" magazine against the "oh-so-cool kickstarted tactile minimalist unoriginal magazines" that are going the rounds – he wants real innovation, ideas and developments. Johannes Conrad on the other hand helped reinvent the spirit of the "Flaneur" - and accelerated the concept of "The Man of the Crowd" to unexpected speed.
 

Steven Gregor (Gym Class), Julia Kahl (Slanted), Alexander Scholz (Holo), Johannes Conrad (Flaneur). Facilitation: Jeremy Leslie

22:00

Molotow

Party Party!
 

There will be a party! Together with our friends from Stadtlichh magazine. More information here.
 

Schedule
So 30 Aug 2015

10:00 - 18:00

Oberhafen, Halle 4
 

#indiemagday – Free Trade Zone for Printed Goods

On the Sunday after the Indiecon, we're going to transform a former warehouse into Magazine Mania. Let's celebrate the diversity of independent magazines and their smart and fearless micro publishers! Find collectibles, hidden treasures and special offers. Buy, sell or swap mags, zines, comics and other printed goods. There will be a huge collection of national and international indiemags – brought to Hamburg by the makers themselves and some of the most amazing stores in Germany. Come and experience magazines, zines, comics, books, posters, postcards and many big or small gifts made of paper. Join us to discuss, talk, eat, drink and dance.
 

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FAQ

What is Indiecon?

Indiecon is a festival for independent magazines. This year it includes a conference, to be held on 28 and 29 August. We are also running #indiemagday, a big Free Trade Zone for Printed Goods on 30 August at Hamburg's Oberhafen that's open to everyone, independently of Indiecon.

Are all the events in English?

Some panel discussions and speeches are likely to be in English and some in German. We are trying to set up professional translation on site, but sadly we can't guarantee that yet. If the worst comes to the worst we'll sit on your lap and interpret simultaneously.

How do I get a ticket for Indiecon?

You can apply for a ticket using the form on this website. We'll get back to you with confirmation as soon as possible. Why the formality? It's very simple: Indiecon is small and cosy and we only have 100 places. That's why we prefer people who really produce a mag themselves. It makes no odds whether the circulation is 100 or 100,000. But if you yourself aren't publishing a magazine yet, it could be that we'd give someone else priority for the ticket. But please don't be upset! This year you can still be in on the act: at #indiemagday at the Oberhafen.

I can't pay that much. What can I do?

We realise that 100 euros is a lot of money – especially if you're currently putting all your time and cash into producing a magazine. But we promise you that Indiecon is worth it. Please pay for a ticket if you possibly can.

However, because we wouldn't want to exclude anyone with a genuine burning interest in the subject, we are giving away a certain number of tickets to helpers this year, free of charge. You can apply for these using the form on this website as well. And if it doesn't work out, we'll hopefully see each other at least at #indiemagday at the Oberhafen.

Is it possible to return the ticket?

No, I'm afraid it isn't – sorry. We need to be able to rely on our budgeting at least to that extent. But you can always transfer the tickets to someone else. Please give us a quick call if you plan to do that.

I've paid – where's my ticket?

We send the tickets from the central office, probably at the beginning of August.

What will be done with my money?

The revenue from the sale of tickets and support from a small number of select sponsors will cover the costs of the event: food, drinks, fringe programme, advertising, travel and accommodation for speakers and helpers. Indiecon is not profit-orientated, all revenue will go into the event. At the end, we will (hopefully) be just over the break-even mark.

Do I have to register for sessions?

There are only a limited number of places available for the "Ask the Expert" format on the Saturday. So you do have to register for that. However, we'll be dealing with that on site on the Friday. If you're not coming until the Saturday, please drop us a line in advance to tell us what you'd like to attend.

Can I sell my magazine at Indiecon?

This year, magazines will be sold at #indiemagday on the Sunday after the conference. You can introduce a wider audience to your magazine, and sell it of course, in the Free Trade Zone for Printed Goods at the Oberhafen in Hamburg. Just take a moment to register: #indiemagday. We'll see to all the rest on site.

Any other questions?

Just ask: info@indiemags.de

Partners

Supporters

Friends

Thanks to

Arne Brenneisen
Malte Brenneisen
Philipp Gieseler
Martin Kaumanns
Malte Spindler
Urs Spindler

Elisa Bilko
Emanuel Tessema
Tine Fetz
Christian Gargosch
Katrin Hirsch
Sebastian Klöpping
Steffen Kraska
Johann Laux
Julian Lemme
Falko Lohrenscheidt
Helge Matthiessen
Janne Meyer
Nicole Michniewski
Nelli Neb
Kim-Lara Oswald
Tristan Rodgers
Helen Robertson
Simeon Rückert
Alexander Sängerlaub
Mareike Scheler
Theda Schillmöller
Martin Sinn
Lennart Spindler
Jens Tiemann
Jannik Tille
Imke Wrage
Kerstin Wöltje

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